Prodigy

Executive Summary

The overall objective of the PRO.D.I.G.Y project is to promote the use and adoption of AR/VR solutions to assist people with disabilities, first responders and companies during workplace emergencies in order to increase the safety of people with disabilities. In addition to the overall objective, a methodological framework will be developed to support the target group in achieving disability inclusion in their response to emergencies Plans. In particular, the framework will assist the target team to plan all planning activities needed to update and strengthen emergency planning to include persons with disabilities. This will include a series of steps required for a successful strategy.

Introduction

Workplace emergencies can strike quickly and without warning, forcing people to evacuate quickly or make quick choices to protect themselves. For the millions of people with disabilities, workplace emergencies are a real challenge. Evidence shows that people with disabilities are often forgotten when companies design their emergency response plans. The inclusion of people with disabilities in workplace emergency response is essential for their safety and the realisation of their employment rights, including through combating discrimination and creating equal opportunities. In this context, the PRO.D.I.G.Y. project aims to train people with disabilities in emergency response through the use of augmented and virtual reality exercises.

The overall objective of the PRO.D.I.G.Y. project is the promotion of the use and adoption of AR/VR solutions to support people with disabilities, first responders and companies during workplace emergencies in order to increase the safety of people with disabilities. The acquired emergency preparedness training will provide people and companies with ways to prepare and protect themselves during unexpected workplace emergencies.

In addition to the overall objective, the first project result intends to provide a methodological framework to support the target group in achieving the inclusion of disability in their emergency response plans. In particular, the Workplace Emergency Preparedness Methodology provides a methodological step-by-step framework to promote workplace emergency planning with disability inclusion.

Terms and Definitions

collection
documents and items under the stewardship of an archive, library or museum, regardless of format

emergency management
overall approach to preventing emergencies and managing those that occur
Note 1 to entry: Emergency management generally utilizes a risk-management approach to prevention, preparedness, response and recovery before, during and after potentially destabilizing and/or disruptive events.
[SOURCE: ISO 22300:2018, 3.78]

emergency preparedness
measures and action taken in advance to mitigate the effects of possible destructive events
Note 1 to entry: This includes drawing up a disaster response plan.
[SOURCE: EN 15898:2011, 3.4.6]

emergency response
immediate phase in the aftermath of an event, consisting of gaining control, limiting the extent of the emergency and minimizing further damage

hazard
source of potential harm
Note 1 to entry: Hazard can be a risk source.
[SOURCE: ISO Guide 73:2009, 3.5.1.4]

incident response
actions taken to stop the causes of an imminent hazard and/or mitigate the consequences of potentially destabilizing or disruptive events and to recover to a normal situation
Note 1 to entry: Incident response is part of the emergency management process.
[SOURCE: ISO 22300:2018, 3.115]

pre-impact phase
phase of warning

recovery
restoration and improvement, where appropriate, of operations, facilities, collections (3.3), livelihoods or living conditions of affected organizations, including efforts to reduce risk factors
[SOURCE: ISO 22300:2018, 3.187, modified — The term "collections" has been added.]

review
activity undertaken to determine the suitability, adequacy and effectiveness of a subject matter to achieve established objectives
[SOURCE: ISO Guide 73:2009, 3.8.2.2]

risk
effect of uncertainty on objectives
Note 1 to entry: An effect is a deviation from the expected — positive and/or negative.
Note 2 to entry: Objectives can have different aspects (such as financial, health and safety, and environmental goals) and can apply at different levels (such as strategic, organization-wide, project, product and process).
Note 3 to entry: Risk is often characterized by reference to potential events and consequences or a combination of these.
Note 4 to entry: Risk is often expressed in terms of a combination of the consequences of an event (including changes in circumstances) and the associated likelihood of occurrence.
Note 5 to entry: Uncertainty is the state, even partial, of deficiency of information related to, understanding or knowledge of an event, its consequence, or likelihood.
[SOURCE: ISO Guide 73:2009, 1.1]

risk assessment
overall process of risk identification, risk analysis and risk evaluation
[SOURCE: ISO Guide 73:2009, 3.4.1]

risk management
coordinated activities to direct and control an organization in regard to risk
[SOURCE: ISO Guide 73:2009, 2.1.1]

risk management plan
scheme within the risk management framework specifying the approach, the management components and resources to be applied to the management of risk
[SOURCE: ISO Guide 73:2009, 2.1.3]

notification
part of public warning (3.183) that provides essential information (3.116) to people at risk (3.166) regarding the decisions and actions necessary to cope with an emergency (3.77) situation

preparedness
readiness
activities, programmes, and systems developed and implemented prior to an incident that can be used to support and enhance prevention, protection from, mitigation of, response to and recovery from disruptions, emergencies or disasters

prevention
measures that enable an organization (3.158) to avoid, preclude or limit the impact (3.107) of an undesirable event (3.268) or potential disruption (3.70)

prioritized activity
activity (3.1) to which priority is given following an incident (3.111) in order to mitigate impacts (3.107)
Note 1 to entry: Terms commonly used to describe these activities include critical, essential, vital, urgent and key.

crisis
unstable condition involving an impending abrupt or significant change that requires urgent attention and action to protect life, assets (3.10), property or the environment
3.60

crisis management
holistic management (3.135)process (3.180) that identifies potential impacts (3.107) that threaten an organization (3.158) and provides a framework for building resilience (3.192), with the capability for an effective response that safeguards the interests of the organization’s key interested parties (3.124), reputation, brand and value-creating activities (3.1), as well as effectively restoring operational capabilities

crisis management team
group of individuals functionally responsible for directing the development and execution of the response and operational continuity (3.49) plan, declaring an operational disruption (3.70) or emergency (3.77)/crisis (3.59) situation, and providing direction during the recovery (3.187)process (3.180), both pre-and post-disruptive incident (3.111)
Note 1 to entry: The crisis management team (3.61) can include individuals from the organization (3.158) as well as immediate and first responders and interested parties (3.124)

exercise
process (3.180) to train for, assess, practise and improve performance (3.167) in an organization (3.158)
Note 1 to entry: Exercises can be used for validating policies, plans, procedures (3.179), training (3.265), equipment, and inter-organizational agreements; clarifying and training personnel (3.169) in roles and responsibilities; improving inter-organizational coordination (3.52) and communications; identifying gaps in resources (3.193); improving individual performance and identifying opportunities for improvement; and a controlled opportunity to practise improvisation.

Bibliography

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Michałowska M., Stankiewicz D., Danielak W. (2015). Zarządzanie sytuacją kryzysową w przedsiębiorstwie. http://ptezg.pl/Files/files/zn2/danielak.pdf

Peoplesafe. (2022, 29 November). Emergency Planning in the Workplace. https://peoplesafe.co.uk/blogs/emergency-planning-in-the-workplace/

Ready Campaign. (n.d.). Emergency Response Plan. https://www.ready.gov/business/implementation/emergency

Skills Training Group. (n.d.). How to Develop a Company Emergency Plan. https://www.skillstg.co.uk/blog/how-to-develop-company-emergency-plan/

Bending, R., and Eden, R. J. (1984). UK Energy: Structure, Prospects, and Policies. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Lillywhite, B.; Wolbring, G. (2022) Emergency and Disaster Management, Preparedness, and Planning (EDMPP) and the ‘Social’: A Scoping Review. Sustainability. 14, 13519. https://doi.org/10.3390/su142013519

Kailes, J. I. (2005). Why and How to Include People with Disabilities in Your Emergency Planning Process?. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas, Research and Training Center on Independent Living.

Care. (2011). Emergency Preparedness Planning (EPP). Retrieved from https://wwwcareemergencytoolkit.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/37_1.pdf

Chojnicki J., Jaroszewicz G., ABC BHP. Informator dla pracodawców, Główny Inspektorat Pracy, Warszawa 2010.

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Karczewski J.T., System zarządzania bezpieczeństwem pracy, Ośrodek Doradztwa i Doskonalenia Kadr oddk, Gdańsk 2000

Krause M., Podstawy zarządzania bezpieczeństwem i higieną pracy w przedsiębiorstwie, Wyższa Szkoła Zarządzania Ochroną Pracy, Katowice 2006

Pawłowska Z., Zarządzanie bezpieczeństwem i higieną pracy,[w:] Koradecka D. (red.), Nauka o pracy - bezpieczeństwo, higiena, ergonomia. Zarządzanie bezpieczeństwem i higieną pracy, Wydawnictwo CIOP, Warszawa 2000

Rabenda A., Elementy systemu zarządzania bezpieczeństwem i higieną pracy [w:] Kowal E., Zarządzanie warunkami pracy, Oficyna Wydawnicza Uniwersytetu Zielonogórskiego, Zielona Góra 2008

E. Hollnagel, J.E. Paries, D.D. Woods, J. Wreathall, Resilience Engineering: in Practice. A Guidebook, Ashgate, Farnham 2011.

https://www.green-courier.eu/

https://www.iso.org/obp/ui/#iso:std:iso:22300:ed-2:v1:en

Barriers and opportunities

The State Analysis Assessment Report is the first output of WP2. It is a state analysis that aims to depict the current situation across Europe regarding the inclusion of people with disabilities in emergency preparedness. The report was developed following interviews with experts, online surveys and desk-based research. The results of the state analysis showed that almost half of the respondents do not have an emergency preparedness plan for people with disabilities in their company's emergency preparedness material. Alternatively, people with disabilities are included in the common plan, which means that they follow general instructions and not specific instructions that cater to their needs. This is a troubling finding because people with disabilities may face additional challenges and barriers during emergencies and disasters.

The report also reveals that the largest percentage of respondents reported that their company does not provide all employees with training related to emergency preparedness with a focus on people with disabilities. Additionally, they do not have sufficient information to create accessible and safe workplaces for every person with a disability who either works or may visit their company. There is, therefore, a lack of information, awareness and training on this important issue, which could have serious consequences for the well-being and safety of disabled employees in the event of an emergency.

At the same time, 32% of respondents do not have a dedicated expert on emergency preparedness, suggesting that there is room for improvement to enhance the preparedness and response capacity of some companies.

Furthermore, 89% of respondents stated that they would benefit from specialized training on emergency preparedness, with a focus on people with disabilities. The most frequently preferred types of training are practical training (on-site) and simulation of the real situation in virtual reality. These types of training are practical, interactive, and provide realistic exposure and adaptability for people with disabilities.

The report also highlights that employees with disabilities are often part of common training in most organizations, or else there is often no provision for specific instructions for these people. This suggests that often employees with disabilities do not receive specialized training and their training opportunities are unequal. Also, there is a lack of clarity and consistency among people with disabilities about what to do in emergency situations.

The interviews conducted also examined whether all employees are aware of the emergency procedures for people with disabilities. The conclusion drawn from the responses is that there is a lack of awareness and training of employees on how to assist and evacuate people with disabilities during a crisis. This is a serious issue that needs to be addressed by management and safety coordinators. Organizations shall provide an inclusive culture and support for employees with disabilities. The already possible general trainings provided would be extended with special trainings for and about people with disabilities.

Finally, most of the experts interviewed indicated that they have flexible emergency preparedness materials that can be adapted to new government regulations or new situations in their company. The responses indicate that participants prefer hands-on training and e-learning as the main ways of learning. Hands-on training refers to activities that allow participants to apply their knowledge and skills in real or simulated situations.

Taking into account all the above findings, a step-by-step methodological framework is proposed to promote disability-inclusive emergency planning in the workplace.

 

Stakeholder Map

To ensure efficient coordination, it is necessary to prepare appropriate plans. Such plans should specify both the evacuation concept and depending on existing conditions, as well as determining the necessary resources to carry out this task. The condition for the effectiveness of the plan is its validity, which must be checked by regularly conducting an inventory of resources and verifying the adopted solutions. It is necessary to prepare a response plan in the event of a threat in the form of: preparation of orderly, logical, rational actions) in the form of standard operating procedures in crisis management plans for the evacuation of disabled persons taking into account the fact that disabled people do not form a uniform groups of people; information and educational activities, acquisition of evacuation skills by the disabled themselves through appropriate training during a potential threat.

The implementation of an emergency preparedness plan should involve appropriately developed procedures and guidelines for dealing with emergencies, methods of alerting (even individual) disabled people, as well as additional responsibilities of other employees of the facility from which the emergency response is being carried out.

When planning, the employer should pay attention to the type and degree of disability, the age of the disabled person and the possible use of assistance from other employees for evacuation purposes. Consideration should also be given to disabled visitors.

For people with disabilities, safe evacuation should include:

  1. type and degree of disability and age of the evacuated persons,
  2. cooperation in evacuation on the part of other persons, e.g. employees and others at the time staying in the building.

People with different disabilities also react differently to emergencies (Disability Etiquette):

  1. Visually impaired people have no fear of the dark and the moment threats perform appropriately described voice commands.
  2. People with hearing disabilities are not limited in their mobility and can walk on their own move around and carry out the demonstrated commands and evacuation activities.
  3. People with intellectual disabilities are physically fit and able to exercise evacuation activities and have a relatively high level of obedience to instructions from a person they know, e.g. an academic teacher.
  4. Persons with mobility disabilities have full and constant contact with the environment by means of all receptors and have no communication barriers.

Considerations towards the methodology development

Driving requirements

The methodology provides a planning and decision-support framework to support target group in achieving disability inclusion in their emergency response plans. It sets out a series of steps needed for a successful emergency preparedness strategy in a consistent and harmonised way. The following aspects have been considered in the selection of key elements to include and analyse in the design of the methodology and its implementation in the TOOLBOX:

  • Know your tools and resources
  • Develop a plan
  • Educate

Selection of elements as part of the methodology

The TOOLBOX is a platform that will combine various information and resources, acting as a comprehensive collection of documents and tools. The methodology presented in this document is based on the type of information that the target business is advised to use in creating a solid, stable and sustainable strategy. The following elements are included in the methodology as references and tools to source. Examples are provided for each element type:

  • Open tools
  • General overview documents
  • Guideline and supporting methodological tools
  • Training materials
  • Templates as working document to use for interacting and checking the progress of the implementation plans
  • Real cases to inspire the target groups in different important aspects related to for establishing an emergency preparedness plans
  • Technical/financial recommendations

The full list of resources included in the methodology is in Table 1 (Annex). The list identifies the resource type and format and the part of the methodology where it is made available.

 

Methodology workflow

The PRODIGY methodology is a methodological step-by-step framework to promote workplace emergency planning with disability inclusion. This framework is divided into a methodology for either developing or updating emergency preparedness strategy plans. Figure 1 shows the workflow of the PRODIGY methodology and the logical streams that connect the blocks.  It consists of three main blocks that represent the key phases of the process: assessment, planning and implementation.

Figure 1: Main phases of the methodology

Depending on the level of maturity of the business, the methodology follows two different approaches. Thus, the first step is to determine whether companies have an existing emergency preparedness plan and wish to update it to be more inclusive of people with disabilities, or if there is no specific emergency preparedness strategy and wish to go back to the key stages of formulating a comprehensive strategy that includes people with disabilities.

Companies are invited to start with Phase 1 in order to assess their state of emergency preparedness and inclusion of persons with disabilities, the challenges and opportunities they face. Based on the preliminary assessment, companies are ready to start developing or updating their emergency preparedness plan (Phase 2) and then their implementation plan, assigning the necessary human and financial resources (Phase 3).

The methodology consists of a consecutive consequence of steps within each phase, as shown in the figures below. However, each phase and step are self-contained and not dependent on the others. The suggested order is only a recommendation to ensure that no relevant information is overlooked during the process, but users can skip steps that they have already completed before using this methodology. The decision to follow all the steps or navigate randomly through the available information is up to the users.

Figure 2: Methodology workflow for developing a new workplace emergency preparedness strategy plan

Figure 3: Methodology workflow for updating an existing workplace emergency preparedness plan

Presentation of information in the methodology

In the following chapters, the phases and steps are described in detail, including the necessary resources needed to implement them. To this end, there are some clarifications to highlight in order to facilitate the understanding of methodology and how the final users will have access to the resources available in the TOOLBOX and how to use them.

Introduction of the Phase:
Each phase includes a short introduction that describes the aim of the phase and what the user can expect. It also includes a reference titled “Who to involve in this phase?” in order to provide complementary information on the target groups need to engage in such phase.

Steps overview and/or description:
Each phase describes the sequence of steps to be followed. Each step includes the following information:

  • Objective: Objective of the step, clarifying what the user will gain at the end of such step
  • Action: An indication on how to use the resources available in that step
  • Material: It clarifies which are the available resources (type of resource). In the TOOLBOX, at this point the user will be able to download the resources indicated.

Recommended/Available Resources:
The resources needed to implement the actions of each step. The resources could be useful links, reports, good practices, guidelines, etc.

Considerations towards implementation:
Extra information to bear in mind when implementing the steps or using the resources made available, also definitions, clarifications or technical recommendations.

 

Phase 1: Assessment of emergency preparedness status of the company

Introduction to Phase 1

Description of Phase 1

The primary objective of Phase 1 is to evaluate your company’s potential by characterising its current emergency preparedness status. Once completed, you will have a comprehensive assessment and analysis of the potential of your company’s current status in terms of emergency preparedness and disability inclusion, along with a SWOT analysis. This information will serve as a foundation for the subsequent phases.

Who to involve in this phase

This phase recommends the involvement of all levels and different members of the company both for its characterization and for the use, analysis and integration of the documents and material provided.

Regarding the collection of information, it is recommended to involve executives or managers from the first stage (examples: senior management team, human resources department, etc.). However, it is also necessary to involve all relevant departments of the company to collect the information needed to create or update the strategy in the subsequent stages.

 

Steps in Phase 1

Step 1: Preliminary characterization of the level of understanding and awareness related to emergency preparedness

  • Objectives: The objective of this step is to conduct a preliminary analysis of your company’s staff to understand the current status in terms of emergency preparedness and disability inclusion understanding and awareness. To this end, the primary goal is to gather information about emergency response and awareness within the company. A digital tool designed to gather all related information is provided for that purpose. This information will provide a comprehensive overview of the current status of the company’s staff members and establish a baseline for subsequent steps in developing or updating the Emergency Preparedness Plan.
  • Actions: Encourage each company staff member to complete the quiz in order to get information related to the current status in terms of emergency preparedness understanding and awareness. Collect the results.
  • Material available:
  • Assess your Knowledge Tool (Self-Assessment Tool) (Link to Prodigy Website)

Step 2: Assessment of the company’s inclusion level for people with disabilities in emergency preparedness

  • Objectives: The second step will evaluate and analyse the potential of your company for establishing a new or updating your emergency preparedness strategy in terms of disability inclusion. The primary objective of this step is to assess your company's potential by characterizing its current state of emergency preparedness. This analysis is carried out in relation to several criteria. The use of the Assess your Company Tool is suggested, in order to assess the status of your company in emergency preparedness and disability inclusion. The assessment results will provide a comprehensive understanding and identification of the areas where improvements can be made - insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the current preparedness measures. This information will guide the development of strategies and actions in subsequent steps to enhance the company's emergency preparedness capabilities.
  • Actions: Complete the quiz to assess the status of your company in emergency preparedness and identify the areas where improvements can be made.
  • Material available: Assess your company tool (Self-Assessment Tool) to assess the workplace emergency preparedness status and disability inclusion. (Link to Prodigy Website)

Step 3: SWOT analysis

  • Objectives: SWOT stands for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. A SWOT analysis is a strategic planning tool used to assess those four aspects of the company. This is how a company can capture its current performance and build a strategy to achieve its future goals. It involves identifying the internal and external factors that can impact the success of the business. The strengths and weaknesses refer to internal factors, such as the organization's resources, capabilities, and limitations. The opportunities and threats refer to external factors, such as market trends, competition, and regulatory changes. By analysing these factors, the organization can develop strategies to capitalize on its strengths, address its weaknesses, seize opportunities, and mitigate threats. This provides a wide picture of how a company can carve a route to reach its objectives.
  • Action: Consult the template below and complete the SWOT table provided.
  • Material: Template document for a SWOT analysis of the company

SWOT ANALYSIS example

STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
The workplace has well-designed evacuation routes that are accessible for individuals with disabilities, with appropriate signage and accommodations.

Employees and emergency response team members have received training on how to assist individuals with disabilities during emergency situations.

Some employees may have limited awareness and understanding of the specific needs of coworkers with disabilities during emergency situations.

Communication channels may not fully accommodate individuals with hearing or speech impairments, potentially creating challenges during emergency alerts and instructions.

Certain areas of the workplace may still have physical barriers that limit accessibility for individuals with mobility impairments, which could impact their ability to evacuate safely.

There is an opportunity to provide additional training sessions or resources focused specifically on supporting individuals with disabilities during emergency situations. Failure to comply with disability-related laws and regulations regarding emergency preparedness can lead to legal consequences and reputational damage.

Failure to address the specific needs of employees with disabilities during emergencies can lead to delays or ineffective response, putting their safety at risk.

 

Considerations towards implementation of Phase 1

This section sets out some considerations on the implementation of this first phase, which is the assessment of the company's emergency preparedness status. It would be useful throughout the implementation of the first phase to have clear and well-defined objectives and roles that you want to implement. The next step is to determine the resources required, and all potential stakeholders who should fully understand the purpose and expected outcomes. Also, set clear timelines and deadlines within which you want to have the emergency preparedness assessment completed, and finally use the most appropriate methods for collecting data during the assessment.

 

Phase 2: Design of an Emergency Preparedness Strategy Plan

Introduction to Phase 2

Description of Phase 2
Phase 2 of the methodology to set up a new emergency preparedness strategy plan involves designing the strategy based on the results of the assessment carried out in phase 1. An emergency preparedness strategic plan is a plan for defining actions to effectively respond to and mitigate potential emergencies or disasters, ensuring the safety of all people involved in your organization, including people with disabilities, and minimizing the impact on business operations. A well-defined and comprehensive emergency preparedness plan can help your business proactively manage risks and ensure a rapid and coordinated response during crisis situations.

Who to involve in this phase?
To ensure the success of your emergency preparedness goals and initiatives, it is crucial to involve the right people and establish a dedicated working group responsible for the development and execution of your emergency preparedness strategy. This team (Emergency Preparedness Management Team) should comprise individuals from various departments and functions within your company, as well as external stakeholders who can provide valuable expertise and support. The following steps outline the composition of the working group, its main objectives, specific actions to be taken, task assignments, and recommended resources.

 

Steps in Phase 2

Step 1: Define the development working group

Objectives:
The first step of this phase is to define the development working group, which is responsible for setting up and reviewing the plan. Establish the working group, fostering cross-functional cooperation and incorporating diverse perspectives for an integrated strategy. Define clear roles, responsibilities, and accountability within the working group. Last, also clarify objectives and scope, identifying key areas of focus and prioritization within the Emergency Preparedness Strategy initiatives.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Establish the working group/Identify possible individuals from relevant departments who possess the necessary expertise and have a vested interest in emergency preparedness. Executive Leadership Team/Emergency Preparedness Decision makers/Safety Officer/HR Consider including representatives from the executive leadership team, safety department, operations, human resources, IT/technology, communications/marketing, legal, and facilities management. To identify the appropriate stakeholders, you can also use or make, if there isn’t any, an organization chart as a reference. After setting the organizational chart, you can easily define the Roles and Responsibilities of your company. Project Management and Stakeholder Analysis templates are also provided.
Define clear roles, responsibilities, and accountability within the working group. Executive Leadership Team/Emergency Preparedness Decision makers Consider using Roles and Responsibilities template. With this, you can easily define the Roles and Responsibilities for this task. You can also utilize the roles given (if relevant) or create new ones that correspond to the needs of your company.
Clarify objectives and scope / Clearly define the purpose and goals of the working group. Executive Leadership Team/Emergency Preparedness Decision makers Communicate with working group the company’s culture regarding the vision, the value and the mission of the project.

Determine the strategic Goals /

Objectives of the emergency preparedness strategy, including indicative areas of focus such as:

  1. Crisis response protocols or regulatory & legal framework,
  2. Communication channels,
  3. Evacuation procedures,
  4. Resource allocation.

Complete Registry with Company’s Policies and Procedures template

Make a PESTLE analysis, an internationally recognised method used for strategy formation. Executive Leadership Team/Emergency Preparedness Decision makers/Safety Officer Use the PESTLE Analysis Tool to identify relevant external factors and ascertaining the impact these could have on your company achieving its goals.
Material available

  • Organizational Chart
  • Project Management
  • Stakeholder Analysis
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • Company’s culture
  • Setting Strategic Goals/Objectives
  • Registry with Company’s Policies and Procedures
  • PESTLE Analysis

Step 2: Determine the priority areas and their corresponding main goals

Objectives:
A critical first step in the adoption of an emergency preparedness strategy plan is the definition of priority areas and their corresponding key objectives. This can be achieved by conducting a comprehensive risk assessment. This objective involves a systematic assessment of the potential risks and threats facing your organization. The risk assessment can identify natural disasters, potential technological accidents, health emergencies and man-made incidents that could affect the entire workplace and in particular challenges that may threaten people with disabilities. Finally, it includes the collection of data on the likelihood and possible consequences of each identified risk. By analysing the risks associated with different scenarios, the working group gains knowledge about the most pressing threats and prioritizes preparedness efforts accordingly. The results of the risk assessment inform the development of targeted response strategies, ensuring that the plan is both risk-informed and resilient.

Based on the risk assessment, a subsequent objective involves analysing historical data of past emergencies, if any. By studying incidents that have occurred in the organization or in similar environments, the team can identify areas of higher risk and recurring vulnerabilities. Understanding patterns and trends from historical data provides valuable information about the types of emergencies that are most likely to occur and their potential impact. Analysis of historical data helps the team responsible for emergency preparedness to identify potential gaps or weaknesses in past response strategies. By learning from past incidents, the team can formulate a specific strategy, ensuring that it is flexible and effective for dealing with real-life challenges. Historical data also provides a basis for developing targeted training and exercises, allowing emergency responders to practice in scenarios that align with the real-world risks your company/organization faces.

A third objective, as an extension of the previous one, is to gather information on perceived vulnerabilities. In particular, an inclusive approach, and in particular an inclusive approach to disability, is essential to the planning process, and this objective focuses on engaging key stakeholders for their valuable input. By consulting with local authorities, emergency services, as well as disabled workers, the team can gain first-hand insights into the perceived vulnerabilities and challenges of disabled people. Local authorities and emergency services provide expert knowledge about the unique characteristics of your area and potential coping constraints.  Working with stakeholders fosters collaboration and ensures that the plan developed is contextually relevant, reflecting your needs and priorities.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Conduct a comprehensive risk assessment to identify potential hazards and threats. Emergency Preparedness Management Team Risk assessment tools and methodologies, such as Risk Management template and guidelines & SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats).
Analyse historical data of past emergencies to identify areas with higher risks. Emergency Preparedness Management Team or/ with Risk Assessment Specialist (if an y) Search for historical data of past emergencies. After it, conduct Data analysis.
Consult with local authorities (Fire Department, Police Department, Public Health Department, Emergency Medical Services, etc.), and community members as well disable workers (if any) to gather insights on perceived vulnerabilities. Emergency Preparedness Management Team or Community Engagement Coordinator or HR Department Surveys, interviews, and focus group discussions for community engagement.
Regulatory & Legal framework analysis. The regulatory and legal framework of a business ensures legality, protection, and adaptability to changing circumstances within your organisation. Emergency Preparedness Management Team or Community Engagement Coordinator or HR Department The provided Regulatory & Legal framework analysis table is designed to assist your company in illustrating and monitoring all pertinent laws and regulations. The company should document the Laws/Regulations applicable and elucidate the connection between each Law/Regulation and the company.
Material available:

  • Risk Management template and guidelines
  • Regulatory & Legal framework analysis

Recommended resources:

 

Step 3: Identify available enabling mechanisms and resources for establishing an emergency preparedness strategy

Objectives:
In Step 3, the primary objectives are to identify and utilize the mechanisms and resources necessary to create a robust and inclusive emergency preparedness strategy tailored to the needs of people with disabilities in the workplace. By undertaking a comprehensive assessment of existing policies, guidelines and resources, the development working group aims to identify potential gaps in addressing disability-related requirements during emergencies. This process will facilitate the formulation of targeted strategies and interventions to ensure the safety, well-being and equal participation of employees with disabilities in emergency preparedness and response efforts.

Identifying available resources, including staff expertise, assistive technologies, accessible facilities and collaboration with external stakeholders, is integral to designing a strategic plan that takes into account the diverse range of disabilities present in the workforce. Involving disability experts and relevant organisations, the development working group seeks to draw on specialist knowledge and best practice to feed into the plan framework. In addition, establishing partnerships with local emergency responders and disability organizations promotes a coordinated approach, aligning efforts to enhance emergency preparedness for all employees.

Through the collaborative efforts in Step 3, the company can bridge potential gaps, leverage existing strengths, and leverage available resources to create a comprehensive and equitable emergency preparedness strategy. By addressing the specific challenges faced by people with disabilities, this phase aims to establish a work culture that prioritizes inclusiveness, responsiveness and proactive measures to ensure the well-being of every employee during emergencies. Ultimately, successful completion of Step 3 sets the stage for the subsequent development of a workable emergency preparedness strategy that incorporates the company's commitment to the well-being and safety of all its employees, including people with disabilities.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Conduct a thorough review of existing emergency preparedness policies and guidelines to identify potential gaps in addressing the needs of people with disabilities. Emergency Preparedness Management including representatives from Human Resources, Facilities Management, Health and Safety, and Disability Resource Office (if applicable). Analysing company documents, conducting interviews with key personnel, and seeking feedback from employees with disabilities through surveys or focus groups.
Engage external disability experts and organizations with expertise in emergency preparedness and response to gain insights and best practices. Emergency Preparedness Management Team/Development working group, with support from the Human Resources team. Inviting experts to workshops or webinars, participating in conferences, and accessing reputable disability-focused resources and reports.
Develop a comprehensive inventory of accessible emergency equipment and facilities within the company premises. Emergency Preparedness Management Team/Facilities Management team, with support from the Health and Safety team. Conducting physical assessments of the workplace, consulting with experts on accessibility requirements, and involving employees with disabilities in the evaluation process.
Establish partnerships with local emergency response agencies and disability organizations to enhance coordination and support during emergencies. Emergency Preparedness Management Team with support from upper management. Holding meetings with relevant stakeholders, signing Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs), and participating in joint emergency preparedness drills.
Recommended resources:

 

Step 4: Draft the strategy document

Objectives:
In Step 4, the primary objectives are to craft a comprehensive emergency preparedness strategy that integrates the identified enabling mechanisms and resources, with a strong focus on inclusivity for people with disabilities. The strategy document aims to provide a clear and actionable roadmap for the entire organization, aligning emergency preparedness efforts with the company's overarching mission and values.

Through a well-crafted executive summary, the strategy seeks to emphasize the significance of an inclusive emergency preparedness plan in safeguarding the well-being of all employees, particularly those with disabilities, during crises. The strategy outlines specific and measurable emergency preparedness goals, with a strong emphasis on addressing the unique needs and vulnerabilities of employees with disabilities. By setting clear objectives and assigning responsibility, the plan ensures accountability and empowers designated personnel to provide necessary support and assistance during emergencies.

With a focus on accessibility, the strategy aims to design communication channels that effectively relay emergency information to all employees, utilizing various modes such as visual, auditory, and written means. By incorporating assistive technologies and conducting usability testing, the plan seeks to maximize the reach and impact of emergency communications, ensuring that vital information is accessible to everyone.

Through the implementation of the outlined actions, the strategy fosters a culture of preparedness, inclusivity, and collaboration within the organization. By continuously evaluating and refining the plan based on feedback and emerging best practices, the strategy remains adaptable and responsive to changing circumstances and needs.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Develop an executive summary outlining the importance of an inclusive emergency preparedness plan and its potential impact on the safety and well-being of all employees. Emergency Preparedness Management Team in collaboration with communication and public relations specialists. Collecting data and statistics on the prevalence of disabilities, highlighting the business case for inclusion. This section will be written at the end of the process and will provide a brief overview of the basic decisions taken. However, in the final emergency preparedness strategy document it has to appear first and in the form of a diagram. It is intended to be very short and accessible. If a narrative is added, it should not exceed half a page and should not contain jargon and excessive acronyms (Care, 2011).
Formulate clear and achievable emergency preparedness goals, with specific focus on addressing the vulnerabilities and needs of employees with disabilities. Emergency Preparedness Management Team led by representatives from a Disability Resource Office or Health and Safety team. Conducting workshops, utilizing insights from disability experts, and ensuring broad input from all relevant stakeholders. Make use of the learning resources provided
Define roles and responsibilities for implementing the emergency preparedness plan, including designated personnel responsible for assisting individuals with disabilities during emergencies. Emergency Preparedness Management Team in collaboration with Human Resources and Health and Safety departments. Creating a detailed organizational structure with actors and roles, providing training to designated personnel, and establishing communication channels for employees with disabilities to request assistance. Make use of the learning resources provided.
Design accessible communication strategies and channels to disseminate emergency information to all employees, including those with disabilities. Emergency Preparedness Management Team, supported by the Communication and IT departments. Incorporating multiple communication modes (visual, auditory, written) in emergency alerts, testing the effectiveness of communication channels, and considering the use of assistive technologies.
Material available:

  • Organizational Chart
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • Setting Strategic Goals/Objectives (SMART)
  • Company’s culture

Recommended resources:

Considerations towards implementation of Phase 2

During the implementation of Phase 2, it is essential to maintain a person-centered approach that acknowledges the diversity of disabilities and the unique needs of each individual. Regular consultations with employees with disabilities should be carried out to ensure their voices are heard and their perspectives are considered in the development of the emergency preparedness plan. Additionally, conducting accessibility audits and usability testing of emergency facilities and equipment can help identify potential barriers and ensure the plan is genuinely inclusive. Open and transparent communication throughout this phase is crucial to foster a culture of trust and inclusivity, allowing employees to actively engage in the process and contribute to the success of the emergency preparedness plan. Lastly, continuous evaluation and refinement of the plan based on feedback, best practices, and changes in regulations will ensure its effectiveness in protecting the safety and well-being of all employees, especially those with disabilities.

 

Phase 3: Development of the Implementation Strategy Plan

Introduction to Phase 3

Description of Phase 3
After assessing the organisation's emergency preparedness status (Phase 1) and designing a strategy (Phase 2), the plan should be implemented at the operational level. The design of an emergency preparedness strategy plan is more strategic and general and requires greater stakeholder engagement and coordination, while the development of the implementation plan requires greater accountability and evaluation and involves more action and monitoring.

First, the implementation plan should consider the real possibilities of implementing individual actions designed for the plan (analyse of the possibilities of carrying out individual tasks or actions by people with disabilities). They should also appropriately allocate resources, including human, financial and material, depending on the organisation's specific activity profile or other conditions inside and outside the organization.

When organizing the emergency preparedness planning of the company with special focus on the people with disabilities, their impairments should be taken into account, obliging the person conducting the response strategy or evacuation to accept it individual approach, taking into account the main problems experienced by representatives of particular groups of people with disabilities that directly hinder and/or slow down the response process of a disabled person.

Who to involve in this phase?
In this phase, it is necessary to involve various actors that can contribute to the implementation of the emergency preparedness plan. The main actors should be the Emergency Preparedness Management Team, a risk management and risk assessment expert. They will coordinate the assessment of potential risks, vulnerabilities and impacts, as well as the identification of mitigation strategies and resources. In addition, it is recommended that managers from different parts of the company are consulted, in particular those responsible for the priority areas mapped in the previous phase. They can provide valuable information on the specific needs and challenges of their departments. Finally, some key departments that should be involved are the marketing department, the finance department, and the general management or finance department. They will help with communication, budgeting and approval of the emergency preparedness plan.

 

Steps in Phase 3

Step 1: Derive specific goals within priority areas, specific actions and responsible for implementation

Objectives:
Objective 1: Phase three should start with checking if there are any changes in priority areas during the implementation (based on Phase 2, Step 2). The main objective of this step should be hierarchy of the most dangerous priority areas (include at least two criteria: life-threatening and most common risk factors).

Objective 2: After hierarchization priority areas, specific goals should be developed to prevent threats from occurring or reduce the impact of their effects. This process should emphasize attainable goals. Goals should be: simple, specific, understandable, easy to implement. Verify whether the developed goals are consistent with the strategic goals of the organization.

Objective 3: Based on the goals, it is necessary to develop activities and assign people who will be responsible for their implementation.

Objective 4: Develop activities/actions with resources and assign people who will be responsible for achieved specific goals. Based on the activities, develop procedures. Make sure they are understandable and feasible for employees with disabilities. Remember to establish clear roles and responsibilities for each member of the team. It is also important to assign tasks and responsibilities to employees who know specificity of area/department they work in the organization. They should know which activities/processes overlap between areas of the organization.

After the initial cost calculation, human resources should be assigned along with the scope of duties and responsibilities to the previously developed activities. Remember to train members of the teams systematically in crisis management procedures.

If the above suggestions are not met, it may turn out that in the event of a specific event that covers more than one area of the organization (e.g. a fire involving the production and customer service departments), the procedures will not be implemented correctly. An example is not counting all people leaving the building because such a task was designed only in one area of the organization's operation.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Check whether priority areas (defined in Phase 2, Step 2 and goals have changed during implementation Emergency Preparedness Management Team

Risk Assessment Specialist

Comparative analysis based on risk assessment tools and methodologies
Hierarchy of the most dangerous priority areas (include at least two criteria: life-threatening and most common risk factors). Emergency Preparedness Management Team/Risk Management Team Selection of tools depending on the specific business profile of the company and the operational capabilities of the risk management team. Proposed tools: black point method, rating, ranking based on established criteria or others
Develop specific goals for priority areas Emergency Preparedness Management Team/Risk Assessment Specialist

It is good to involve the managers from parts of the company in what the priority areas where mapped (he knows the specific of the department)

Most popular methods: SMART
Develop activities and assign responsibilities to competent people Development working group, including representatives from Human Resources, Facilities Management, Health and Safety, and Disability Resource Office (if applicabile). Brain storms, experts panels, mind mapping
Material available:

  • Setting Strategic Goals/Objectives (SMART)

Recommended resources:

 

Step 2: Assign specific financial mechanisms and resources to the defined specific actions

Objectives:
It is beneficial for employers to allocate appropriate finances and resources. By allocating sufficient resources and financial support, the plan aims to establish a workplace that is accessible and inclusive, providing ample support to disabled individuals during emergency situations. This funding facilitates the creation of customized evacuation plans, accessible facilities, training, and accommodations, thereby fostering a more inclusive and better prepared environment for all. Moreover, it is important to acknowledge that many European countries offer financial support schemes for companies that hire disabled individuals.

Actions:
For those seeking to secure funding for an emergency preparedness plan that accommodates individuals with disabilities, there are a variety of potential sources available. Here are some options to consider:

  1. Government Grants and Subsidies: Many governments and local authorities offer grants, subsidies, or financial support programs specifically aimed at promoting inclusivity and accessibility in the workplace. These programs may provide funding for training, infrastructure improvements, and equipment necessary for emergency preparedness.
  2. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Initiatives: Some companies allocate a portion of their budget to CSR initiatives, including projects that focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion. Such initiatives may align with the company's values and mission, making it more likely to allocate funds for inclusive emergency preparedness.
  3. Nonprofit Organizations and Foundations: There are nonprofit organizations and foundations that support disability inclusion and emergency preparedness efforts. These entities may offer grants or sponsor projects that align with their mission and objectives.
  4. Partnerships and Sponsorships: Collaboration with other companies, disability organizations, or local community groups can lead to shared funding opportunities. Partnerships can help leverage resources and funding from multiple sources.
  5. Tax Incentives and Benefits: In some regions, there might be tax incentives or benefits for companies that invest in disability inclusion and accessibility projects. These incentives can help offset the costs associated with implementing an emergency preparedness plan.
  6. Employee Giving Programs: Such programs are a way for companies to encourage their employees to donate to various charitable causes. These programs often include initiatives that focus on disability inclusion. Some companies even offer matching programs, which means that they will match the donations made by their employees. This can greatly increase the impact of employee donations and help to support important causes.
  7. Budget Reallocation: Companies can consider reallocating a portion of their existing budget to prioritize disability inclusion and emergency preparedness. By recognizing the importance of this aspect, funds can be redirected to support the initiative.

When seeking financing for the project, it's essential to clearly outline the project's goals, expected outcomes, and the positive impact it will have on both the company and the community. Demonstrating the project's alignment with the organization's values and long-term benefits can be influential in securing funding from various sources.

The European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF) serve as the primary financial tools in the EU's efforts to enhance economic and social cohesion. They aid in promoting social inclusion for the most disadvantaged individuals, including those with disabilities. (https://commission.europa.eu/funding-tenders/find-funding/funding-management-mode/2014-2020-european-structural-and-investment-funds_en ). In 2014-2020, the European Structural and Investment Funds (ESI Funds) unleashed a total investment of €731 billion, of which €535 billion was funded by the EU. More than 4 million small and medium businesses (SMEs) were supported. ESI Funds were also at the frontline of the support to Member States and Regions to face the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic impact. (https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_23_389 ) To learn more on how to apply for such funding, visit https://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/funding/accessing-funds_en.

The availability of specific financing programs may vary depending on the region, country, and local policies. Therefore, it is advisable for employers to conduct thorough research and engage with financial institutions, industry associations, and government agencies to identify the most suitable options for their specific strategy.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Contact local disability organizations HR department or any person designated to assist disabled coworkers Run a detailed Internet Research for your region or use the provided list of national associations
Inform yourself, which governmental organizations are responsible for people with disabilities in your region CEO or HR department or any person designated to assist disabled coworkers Internet Research
Check your Corporate Social Responsibility Statement HR department or any person designated to assist disabled coworkers Is there an allocated budget for inclusive initiatives?
Start a campaign to acquire Partnerships and Sponsorships Marketing Department Strategy, Plan, Execute, Evaluate
Contact your accountant or tax consultant Financial Department Ask for Tax Incentives and Benefits related to disability inclusion
Start an Employee Giving Programs Marketing or HR Department Strategy, Plan, Execute, Evaluate
Evaluate a possible Budget Reallocation Financial Department Management Decision making
Evaluate the possibility of EU funding General Management or Financial Department Apply by following the instructions for applications
Material available:

List of national associations for people with disabilities (ΑΝΝΕΧ Ι)

Recommended resources:

Step 3: Develop the final strategy and implementation plan

Objectives:
To develop the final strategy and implementation plan aims at creation of effective framework that enables an organization to prepare for, respond to, and quickly recover from emergency situations. This plan should serve as a roadmap for the company and its of all its employees, regardless of their health status or abilities and how to pass emergency situations with minimum needed negative impacts to the people and companies property.

In this phase, all the prepared materials should be collected, examined and chosen in order to support the final version of emergency implementation plan. This plan should be reviewed, finalised and shared within the company environment.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Review and Consolidate Sub-Materials Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Go back to the sub-materials you have collected, including the risk assessment, involvement of employees with disabilities, and steps to develop the emergency plan.
Identify Key Objectives Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Based on the reviewed sub-materials, identify the key objectives of the emergency preparation strategy (safeguarding employee, protecting assets, ensuring business continuity, and promoting inclusivity).
Define Roles and Responsibilities Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Clearly define roles and responsibilities for each department and individual involved in emergency preparation. Assign specific tasks and duties to ensure a coordinated response during emergencies.
Address Disability Inclusion Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Develop strategies to address disability inclusion in the emergency preparation strategy. Ensure that the needs of employees with disabilities are considered.
Develop final communication channels for emergency situations Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Specify how information will be shared both internally and externally, and ensure that communication channels are accessible to all employees, including those with disabilities.
Share the plan with employees and collect the feedback. Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management
Finalise the plan and prepare for training.

 

Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management
Revise the plan according to the results of training. Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management
Material available:

  • Organizational Chart
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • Setting Strategic Goals/Objectives (SMART)

Recommended resources:

 

Step 4: Define how to execute and monitor the implementation plan

Objectives:
The first and the most important objective is to ensure that the organization is adequately prepared to respond to various types of emergencies. By executing the plan and regularly monitoring its implementation (by simulations or in real situations), the organization can identify and address any gaps or weaknesses in preparedness

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Settle key emergency preparedness Indicators. Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management f.e response time, communication effectiveness, employee training completion rates, and any other relevant metrics.
Responsibilities Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Settle individuals or a team responsible for monitoring the implementation of the plan. Clearly outline their roles and responsibilities in regularly assessing and evaluating the plan's progress.

 

Regular trainings and Exercises: Settle regular emergency trainings and exercises to test the plan's implementation. Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management It is possible to identify strengths and weaknesses in the response through the simulation of various emergency situations which can be used to improve the plan.
Feedback from training Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Collect feedback from employees, stakeholders, and participants involved in trainings and exercises. Gather insights into the effectiveness of the plan, challenges faced, and suggestions for improvement
Feedback from existing emergency situations Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Analyse feedback from any real emergency situations that occurred. Examine how the plan was executed, identify any gaps or issues, and use these insights to improve the plan
Keep the emergency plan up to date Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management
Material available:

  • Organizational Chart
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • Setting Strategic Goals/Objectives
  • 3.7 Interactive AR/VR Pilot Exercises

Recommended resources:

Considerations towards implementation of Phase 3

Carefully considering all the steps of preparation and monitoring of organization emergency plan can ensure that organization’s emergency plan is well-implemented, meets the specific needs of the organization and its employees, particularly those with disabilities, and supports the organization's ability to respond effectively during emergency situations.

 

 

Phase 1: Revision of the assessment of workplace emergency preparedness status of the company

This phase is the same as Phase 1 of the Methodology for creating a NEW strategic emergency preparedness plan. To avoid repetition, please see here: Μethodology to set up a NEW Emergency Preparedness Strategy Plan

 

Phase 2: Revision of the Emergency Preparedness Plan

Introduction to Phase 2

Description of Phase 2
In Phase 2 of the Emergency Preparedness Plan revision, the focus shifts towards workplaces, ensuring that businesses are well-equipped to safeguard the lives and well-being of all employees, including those with disabilities, during emergencies. This phase involves a meticulous reassessment and enhancement of existing emergency protocols to accommodate the diverse needs of employees with disabilities.

Who to involved in this phase?
It is suggested to involve the same actors with Phase 1.

Steps in Phase 2

Step 1: Define the strategy and /or implementation update plan

Objectives

  • Identifying Goals: It means identifying the fundamental purpose of the plan. What are you trying to achieve with the revision? The goal might be to enhance the inclusivity and effectiveness of the emergency response system, specifically catering to the needs of disabled individuals.
  • Analysis: The first step involves a detailed analysis of the existing Emergency Preparedness Plan. It includes understanding current protocols, identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis), and assessing the plan's alignment with the organization's goals and the needs of the community, including disabled individuals.
  • Key Consideration: Identify gaps in the existing plan that hinder its effectiveness, especially concerning the inclusion of disabled people.

 

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Evaluate the effectiveness of existing goals and objectives, determining their alignment with the company's overall emergency preparedness strategy. Define the vision, mission and objectives of the updated emergency preparedness plan Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management

  • Assessing the achievement of previous goals, conducting surveys or focus groups with relevant stakeholders, and consulting with emergency management experts.
  • Determine the strategic Goals / Objectives of the updated emergency preparedness strategy, including indicative areas of focus such as:

  1. Crisis response protocols or regulatory & legal framework,
  2. Communication channels,
  3. Evacuation procedures,
  4. Resource allocation.

Define clear roles, responsibilities, and accountability within the working group. Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Consider using Roles and Responsibilities template. With this, you can easily define the Roles and Responsibilities for this task. You can also utilize the roles given (if relevant) or create new ones that correspond to the needs of your company.
Develop a timeline and budget for the implementation of the updated emergency preparedness plan Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Consider using a project management tool or a Gantt chart to assign tasks, resources, deadlines and costs and to monitor the progress and performance of the review process.
Material available:

  • Project Management Template
  • Roles and Responsibilities Template
  • Setting Strategic Goals/Objectives Template (SMART)

Recommended resources:

 

Step 2: Analyze opportunities for improvement in the strategy and the implementation plan

Objectives:

Objective 1: Analyse incident reports and historical data from previous emergencies to identify recurring challenges and patterns, particularly those affecting individuals with disabilities.

In order to create a solid basis for the revision of the plan, it is essential to thoroughly examine accident reports and historical data from previous emergencies, with a specific focus on the experiences of people with disabilities. This objective involves examining past incident records to recognise trends, persistent problems and patterns that disproportionately impact people with disabilities. By delving into common obstacles encountered during emergencies, the Emergency Preparedness Management Team gains valuable insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the current plan, especially with regard to inclusiveness.

Through this analysis, the team can identify areas that require improvement, such as response times, resource allocation and communication strategies, from a disability inclusion perspective. Using past meetings allows the team to learn lessons from both successes and failures, informing the review process with real experiences that can lead to more efficient and effective emergency response strategies for people with disabilities.

Objective 2: Perform a comprehensive evaluation comparing the existing plan with universally recognized best practices and standards for accessibility and disability inclusion.

One of the main aims of the update is to ensure that the Emergency Preparedness Plan is in line with best practice and established standards for emergency management, with a strong emphasis on accessibility and inclusion of people with disabilities. This involves conducting a comprehensive assessment to measure how well the current plan aligns with the most recognised and effective approaches in the field, particularly those that address the needs of people with disabilities.

The team compares the current plan with established national and international guidelines and recommendations from renowned organisations specialising in accessible emergency management. By identifying gaps between the current plan and these benchmarks, the team can focus on areas that need improvement from an accessibility and inclusion perspective. The comprehensive assessment facilitates the integration of innovative strategies and practices into the updated plan, ensuring that it remains at the forefront of emergency preparedness for people with disabilities.

Objective 3: Solicit input from a diverse range of stakeholders, including individuals with disabilities, community members, and emergency responders, regarding their experiences and insights for enhancement.

Stakeholder input plays a key role in the success of the Emergency Preparedness Plan review, particularly when it comes to people with disabilities. This involves actively seeking input from a diverse range of stakeholders, including people with disabilities, community members and emergency responders, as well as other relevant partners. By engaging these key stakeholders, the team gains a holistic understanding of their experiences, perspectives and suggestions for improvement, particularly from the perspective of accessibility and inclusion of people with disabilities.

Stakeholder involvement fosters a sense of ownership and commitment, which is essential for the successful implementation of the plan. The team employs methods such as surveys, focus groups and meetings to gather insights, concerns and innovative ideas. By incorporating stakeholder feedback, the updated plan is realistic and community-focused, addressing the specific needs and challenges of people with disabilities during emergencies.

In conclusion, the objectives of analysing past incidents, conducting a comprehensive assessment and seeking stakeholder input are the key pillars for updating an emergency preparedness plan with a strong emphasis on disability inclusion. By drawing from historical experiences, adhering to universal standards and involving stakeholders, the updated plan becomes a resilient and adaptable strategy, better equipped to safeguard and support the entire organisation, particularly people with disabilities, in moments of emergency.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Review incident reports and data from past emergencies to identify recurring issues and trends. Emergency Preparedness Management Team Incident data analysis using statistical tools and data visualization.
Conduct a gap analysis comparing the current plan against best practices and industry standards. Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management /Incident Analysis Specialist Benchmarking against established emergency preparedness frameworks and guidelines.
Seek feedback from stakeholders, including community members and emergency responders, on their experiences and suggestions for improvement. Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Surveys, interviews, and focus group discussions for gathering stakeholder feedback.
Recommended resources:

●       Previous incident reports and after-action reviews.

●       National and international standards for emergency preparedness and response.

●       Surveys and assessment tools used by other emergency management agencies.

●       Information and documentation - Emergency preparedness and response - ISO21110:2019

●       Occupational health and safety - ISO 45001

●       International emergency management standards: ISO 22320:2018

●       Review of Disability-inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction Policy and Practice across Europe and Central Asia, Annex 1. Good practice case studies

●       The Job Accommodation Network Emergency Evacuation Resources

●       List of State Emergency Management Agencies

●       9-1-1 and Emergency Communications Services

●       Effective Communications for People with Disabilities: Before, During, and After Emergencies

●       Ready.gov Information for Individuals with Disabilities

●       Disability-Inclusive Workplace Emergency Plans: Tips for Employers

●       All Under One Roof-Disability-inclusive shelter and settlements in emergencies

●       Guidelines for Assisting People with Disabilities during Emergencies, Crises and Disasters, Successful Implementation

●       Guide on the special needs of people with disabilities for emergency managers, planners & responders

●       Emergency Awareness Checklist for Managers

●       Workplace Emergency Planning for Workers with Disabilities: A Handbook for Employers and Workers

●       Evacuation Planning of Critical Infrastructures in case of an Earthquake or a Fire for People with Disabilities

●       Emergency Preparedness Guide for People with Disabilities

●       Incident Report Guide: All You Need To Know.

●       What is Incident Reporting and Why Is It Important?

●       International emergency management standards: Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction

●       Individual Emergency Response Plan Templates (Appendix 4)

●       Communicating With and About People With Disabilities

●       Emergency Awareness Checklist for Managers

●       Workplace Emergency Planning for Workers with Disabilities: A Handbook for Employers and Workers

●       Emergency Preparedness Guide for People with Disabilities

Step 3: Update priority areas, corresponding main and specific goals

Task Responsible Possible methods
Selection of priority areas to be updated based on the results of the SWOT and gap analysis Emergency Preparedness Management Team Use a scoring system by assigning a numerical value to each area based on its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.
Update priority areas to address emerging risks and vulnerabilities, with a specific focus on the unique needs of individuals with disabilities. Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management with (external) disability experts. Reviewing data on workplace demographics, conducting accessibility assessments, and seeking insights from disability advocacy organizations.
Revise and redefine the main and specific goals, ensuring they are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART). Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management in collaboration with departmental representatives and emergency response teams. Holding goal-setting workshops, using a participatory approach, and ensuring broad representation of perspectives.
Recommended resources:

·        Initiative from European Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Authority (HERA)

·        What to Consider when Building an Emergency Preparedness Plan

·        Disability-Inclusive Workplace Emergency Plans: Tips for Employers

·        All Under One Roof-Disability-inclusive shelter and settlements in emergencies

·        Guidelines for Assisting People with Disabilities during Emergencies, Crises and Disasters, Successful Implementation

·        Guide on the special needs of people with disabilities for emergency managers, planners & responders

·        Emergency Awareness Checklist for Managers

·        Workplace Emergency Planning for Workers with Disabilities: A Handbook for Employers and Workers

·        Evacuation Planning of Critical Infrastructures in case of an Earthquake or a Fire for People with Disabilities

·        Emergency Preparedness Guide for People with Disabilities

Considerations towards implementation of Phase 2

During the implementation of Phase 2, several critical considerations should be taken into account to ensure the success and effectiveness of the revised Emergency Preparedness Plan. First and foremost, the involvement of employees with disabilities throughout the updating process is crucial. Engaging employees in focus groups, surveys, and feedback sessions will provide valuable insights and perspectives that can inform the plan's inclusivity and responsiveness.

Moreover, collaboration and communication between different departments and stakeholders are essential to ensure a cohesive and integrated approach. By fostering a culture of collaboration, the company can capitalize on diverse expertise and create a plan that addresses the specific needs of all employees.

Furthermore, continuous training and education for all employees, especially those designated as emergency responders or support personnel, are vital. Providing training on disability awareness and inclusive emergency response practices will equip the workforce to assist individuals with disabilities effectively during crises.

Regular drills and simulations should be conducted to test the revised plan's efficacy and identify areas for improvement. Observing how employees respond to emergency scenarios will reveal strengths and weaknesses, enabling refinement of procedures and enhancing overall preparedness.

Lastly, remaining adaptable and responsive to changing circumstances and new information is crucial. The revised plan should be a living document that can evolve with emerging best practices, technological advancements, and updates in regulations, ensuring its relevance and effectiveness in protecting the safety and well-being of all employees, including those with disabilities.

 

Phase 3: Update of the Implementation plan

Introduction to Phase 3

Updating the implementation of an emergency plan in companies is very important because it ensures that the organizations remain adaptive, proactive and prepared to respond to the ever changing landscape of risks and emergencies. Emergency plans have to contain up-to-date information and contacts to be possible to use emergency preparedness plans effectively during any potential risk situation. Involving people with disabilities in company emergency plans and its updates requires a proactive and inclusive approach that considers their unique needs and abilities.

Emergency preparedness is an ongoing process. That is why it is necessary to review and update the plan regularly (recommended time – once a year) or whenever significant changes occur within the company or in the external environment. Areas which have to be checked and updated are following:

  • External potentional risks (taking into account people with disabilities)
  • Internal potentional risks (taking into account people with disabilities)
  • Information about specific employees needs relevant for emergency situation (especially with concentration on employees with disabilities)
  • Contacts for people and organisations (taking into account people with disabilities)
  • System of communication and sharing information with employees during emergency situations to ensure effective and fast reaction
  • Evacuation and emergency escape routes (taking into account people with disabilities)
  • Emergency Supplies and Equipment such as first aid kits, fire extinguishers, flashlights, batteries to ensure to be ready to work in case of emergency situation
  • Employees awareness – training of employees regarding implementation of changes in emergency plans (escape routes, evacuation principles and meeting point in case of evacuation, how to use emergency equipment, roles in emergency situation, how to support people with disabilities during emergency situation)
  • Legislation changes – up to date emergency plan with any legislation changes and related actions

Who to involve in this phase?
In the update process there should be involved employees from various departments within the company, especially: responsible people from management, human resources, security, IT, operations, and safety teams. Gather input from employees with disabiliites who might have valuable insights into potential risks and effective response strategies.

 

Steps in Phase 3

Step 1: Revision and update of the implementation plan for the Emergency Preparedness

Objectives:
The objective is to review the existing implementation plan and assess its effectiveness, relevance and feasibility. Identify any changes or new developments in the internal and external environment that may affect the objectives of emergency preparedness or the implementation plan. Consult with relevant stakeholders, such as staff, management, partners, donors, beneficiaries, authorities and other humanitarian actors to seek their feedback and input on the implementation plan. Communicate the revised or updated implementation plan to all stakeholders and secure their commitment and support for its implementation; incorporate any lessons, best practices or recommendations from previous emergencies or exercises into the implementation plan; and finally, communicate the revised or updated implementation plan to all stakeholders and secure their commitment and support for its implementation.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Risk Assessment to check and identify potential hazards, vulnerabilities, and specific risks that the company may face from employees (including employees with disabilities point of view) – external and internal (natural disasters, fires, chemical spills, cybersecurity threats, etc.). Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Involve people with disabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Update information about specific employees needs, those needs which have to be taken into account in connection with any emergency situation

 

Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management

  • Create safe communication channel which will collect information about employees specific needs relevant to emergency situations
  • Test the specific needs important for emergency situations (mobility, sensory, cognitive, and communication skills). Understand how different disabilities may impact their ability to respond during emergencies

Update Contact Information Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management You have to ensure that all contact information for employees, emergency services, and relevant external bodies (e.g., hospitals, fire departments) is up to date.
Update the system of communication in emergency situation  to quickly share information to all employees in case of an emergency situation Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Involve people with disabilities
Review Evacuation Plans and Escape Routes Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management

  • Check and update evacuation plans, escape routes, and meeting points.
  • Involve people with disabilities.
  • Maybe personalised emergency plans can be prepared for people with disabilities and their evacuation/escape routes.

Emergency Supplies and Equipment Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management

  • Review and replenish emergency supplies and equipment, such as first aid kits, fire extinguishers, flashlights, batteries, etc. Review all the necessary special  equipment and assistive devices for employees with disabilities.
  • Involve people with disabilities

Train Employees. All the employees should be familiar with the emergency preparedness plan according to their role which is settled in the plan. The should be aware of how to respond to different types of emergencies and how to assist people with disabilities Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management Involve people with disabilities
Material available:

  • Risk Management template and guidelines

Recommended resources:

 

Step 2: Assign new financial mechanisms and resources to the updated strategy & implementation plan

Objectives:
In a scenario where an existing emergency preparedness plan needs updating, employers should consider allocating adequate finances and resources. By doing so, the plan can be enhanced to establish an even more accessible and inclusive workplace, providing comprehensive support to disabled individuals during emergencies. The additional funding will enable the creation of personalized evacuation strategies, improved accessibility in facilities, specialized training, and tailored accommodations. This will lead to a more inclusive and well-prepared environment for all employees. It is also worth noting that many European countries offer financial support schemes for companies that employ disabled individuals, further incentivizing the updating of the plan to promote inclusivity and safety.

For those seeking to secure funding for an emergency preparedness plan that accommodates individuals with disabilities, there are a variety of potential sources available. Here are some options to consider:

  • Government Grants and Subsidies: Many governments and local authorities offer grants, subsidies, or financial support programs specifically aimed at promoting inclusivity and accessibility in the workplace. These programs may provide funding for training, infrastructure improvements, and equipment necessary for emergency preparedness.
  • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Initiatives: Some companies allocate a portion of their budget to CSR initiatives, including projects that focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion. Such initiatives may align with the company's values and mission, making it more likely to allocate funds for inclusive emergency preparedness.
  • Nonprofit Organizations and Foundations: There are nonprofit organizations and foundations that support disability inclusion and emergency preparedness efforts. These entities may offer grants or sponsor projects that align with their mission and objectives.
  • Partnerships and Sponsorships: Collaboration with other companies, disability organizations, or local community groups can lead to shared funding opportunities. Partnerships can help leverage resources and funding from multiple sources.
  • Tax Incentives and Benefits: In some regions, there might be tax incentives or benefits for companies that invest in disability inclusion and accessibility projects. These incentives can help offset the costs associated with implementing an emergency preparedness plan.
  • Employee Giving Programs: Such programs are a way for companies to encourage their employees to donate to various charitable causes. These programs often include initiatives that focus on disability inclusion. Some companies even offer matching programs, which means that they will match the donations made by their employees. This can greatly increase the impact of employee donations and help to support important causes.
  • Budget Reallocation: Companies can consider reallocating a portion of their existing budget to prioritize disability inclusion and emergency preparedness. By recognizing the importance of this aspect, funds can be redirected to support the initiative.

When seeking financing for the project, it's essential to clearly outline the project's goals, expected outcomes, and the positive impact it will have on both the company and the community. Demonstrating the project's alignment with the organization's values and long-term benefits can be influential in securing funding from various sources.

The European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF) serve as the primary financial tools in the EU's efforts to enhance economic and social cohesion. They aid in promoting social inclusion for the most disadvantaged individuals, including those with disabilities. (https://commission.europa.eu/funding-tenders/find-funding/funding-management-mode/2014-2020-european-structural-and-investment-funds_en ). In 2014-2020, the European Structural and Investment Funds (ESI Funds) unleashed a total investment of €731 billion, of which €535 billion was funded by the EU. More than 4 million small and medium businesses (SMEs) were supported. ESI Funds were also at the frontline of the support to Member States and Regions to face the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic impact. (https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_23_389 ) To learn more on how to apply for such funding, visit https://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/funding/accessing-funds_en

Actions:
Τhe availability of specific financing programs may vary depending on the region, country, and local policies. Therefore, it is advisable for employers to conduct thorough research and engage with financial institutions, industry associations, and government agencies to identify the most suitable options for their specific strategy.

Task Responsible Possible methods
Contact local disability organizations HR department or any person designated to assist disabled coworkers Run a detailed Internet Research for your region or use the provided list of national associations
Inform yourself, which governmental organizations are responsible for people with disabilities in your region CEO or HR department or any person designated to assist disabled coworkers Internet Research
Check your Corporate Social Responsibility Statement HR department or any person designated to assist disabled coworkers Is there an allocated budget for inclusive initiatives?
Start a campaign to acquire Partnerships and Sponsorships Marketing Department Strategy, Plan, Execute, Evaluate
Contact your accountant or tax consultant Financial Department Ask for Tax Incentives and Benefits related to disability inclusion
Start an Employee Giving Programs Marketing or HR Department Strategy, Plan, Execute, Evaluate
Evaluate a possible Budget Reallocation Financial Department Management Decision making
Evaluate the possibility of EU funding General Management or Financial Department Apply by following the instructions for applications
Material available:

List of national associations for people with disabilities (ΑΝΝΕΧ Ι)

Recommended resources:

 

Step 3: Develop the final strategy and the implementation plan

Objectives:

Objective 1: Consolidate all the proposed enhancements and revisions into a cohesive and integrated plan.

To achieve the goal of a comprehensive and effective Emergency Preparedness Plan, it is essential to consolidate all the proposed enhancements and revisions into a cohesive and integrated framework. This objective entails carefully reviewing each suggested improvement, analysing its potential impact, and seamlessly integrating it into the existing plan. By harmonizing the various updates, the plan becomes a unified and coherent strategy, ensuring that all elements work together seamlessly during emergencies.

During the consolidation process, the Emergency Preparedness Management Team collaborates closely, facilitating discussions and brainstorming sessions to align different perspectives and ideas. Through this collaborative effort, redundancies are eliminated, and gaps in the plan are filled, creating a more robust and streamlined strategy. The final result is a singular plan that incorporates the collective knowledge and expertise of all involved stakeholders, strengthening the overall emergency response capabilities of the organization or community.

Objective 2: Ensure alignment with relevant policies, regulations, and best practices in emergency management.

A critical objective during the update of the Emergency Preparedness Plan is to ensure alignment with pertinent policies, regulations, and best practices in emergency management. This involves evaluating the plan against national and international guidelines, local laws, and industry standards. Compliance with these regulations not only enhances the plan's credibility and acceptance but also ensures a legally sound and ethical approach to emergency preparedness.

To achieve this objective, the team responsible for updating the plan conducts thorough research, referencing reputable sources and guidelines from emergency management organizations. They assess the plan's content, procedures, and protocols against the latest developments and evolving best practices in the field. Any deviations or shortcomings are identified and addressed, resulting in a plan that adheres to the highest standards of emergency management.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Consolidate all the proposed enhancements and revisions into a cohesive and integrated plan. Emergency Preparedness Management Team Collaborative workshops and meetings to bring together inputs from various stakeholders.
Ensure alignment with relevant policies, regulations, and best practices in emergency management. Strategy Development Lead Review and analysis of existing policies and guidelines related to emergency management.
Document and Distribute the Updated Plan Emergency Preparedness Management Team; company management After completing the updates, document the revised emergency preparedness plan and make sure it's accessible to all relevant employees.
Recommended resources: 

 

Step 4: Define how to execute and monitor the implementation plan

Objectives:

Objective 1: Familiarize stakeholders with the updated implementation plan through effective public awareness campaigns and clear communication channels.

As part of the implementation phase, the Emergency Preparedness Management Team aims to ensure that stakeholders are well-acquainted with the revised plan. This objective involves launching targeted public awareness campaigns and establishing transparent communication channels. By disseminating information through accessible mediums and engaging with the community, the team strives to promote a shared understanding of the plan's key components, procedures, and objectives.

Through open dialogues, workshops, and informational materials, stakeholders gain insights into their roles and responsibilities during emergencies. By fostering a sense of ownership and comprehension, the plan's effectiveness is heightened, ensuring a coordinated response that caters to the needs of diverse individuals, including those with disabilities.

Objective 2: Maintain resources and equipment to ensure readiness, while regularly testing, monitoring, and updating response strategies.

A crucial aspect of the updated plan is the ongoing maintenance and readiness of resources and equipment. This objective entails regular assessments of available resources, such as medical supplies, communication tools, and accessibility aids. By conducting periodic tests, monitoring exercises, and updates, the Emergency Preparedness Management Team ensures that all components are in optimal condition and aligned with evolving requirements.

Consistent testing and monitoring contribute to the plan's reliability, enabling quick adaptations and improvements in response to changing circumstances. By proactively addressing any equipment or resource gaps, the plan remains agile and effective, especially in catering to the needs of individuals with disabilities during emergencies.

Objective 3: Implement effective incident management and comprehensive record-keeping processes to enhance accountability and learning.

An essential facet of emergency preparedness is proficient incident management and thorough record-keeping. This objective involves establishing streamlined procedures for incident response and documentation. By effectively managing incidents, the team ensures a well-coordinated and timely response that safeguards lives and property, while prioritizing the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Additionally, comprehensive record-keeping facilitates post-incident analysis, enabling the team to learn from experiences and continually improve the plan. By identifying successful strategies and areas for enhancement, the plan evolves over time, becoming more adaptive and finely tuned to the community's requirements.

In conclusion, these objectives focus on stakeholder engagement, ongoing plan maintenance, and comprehensive risk management. By familiarizing stakeholders with the plan, maintaining resources and equipment, and implementing effective incident management, the updated Emergency Preparedness Plan becomes a dynamic and resilient tool, capable of catering to diverse needs and ensuring the safety and well-being of all community members, including those with disabilities.

Actions:

Task Responsible Possible methods
Familiarize stakeholders with the updated implementation plan through effective public awareness campaigns and clear communication channels. Emergency Preparedness Management Team together with Communication team Collaborative workshops and dissemination and exploitation activities involving stakeholders and relevant public actors.
Maintain resources and equipment to ensure readiness, while regularly testing, monitoring, and updating response strategies. Resource Management and Maintenance Team Conduct routine equipment inspections and maintenance checks to ensure operational readiness and identify potential issues.
Implement effective incident management and comprehensive record-keeping processes to enhance accountability and learning. Emergency Preparedness Management Team Conduct regular tests and simulations to test incident response protocols and identify areas for improvement.
Material available:

  • Regulatory & Legal framework analysis
  • 3.7 Interactive AR/VR Pilot Exercises

Recommended resources:

Considerations towards implementation of Phase 3

Phase 3 involves updating the Implementation plan and requires careful consideration to ensure successful implementation. Several key factors must be taken into account to enhance the plan's effectiveness and responsiveness.

First and foremost, stakeholder engagement is essential. Involving all relevant parties, including emergency response agencies, community members, and other key partners, fosters a collaborative approach and ensures diverse perspectives are considered. Stakeholder input is invaluable in refining the plan to align with the specific needs and challenges of the organization or community.

Resource allocation is another critical consideration. Adequate resources, including financial and human resources, must be assigned to support the plan's execution. Adequate funding and skilled personnel are crucial for effectively implementing the plan's strategies and ensuring smooth emergency response operations.

Flexibility is paramount. The plan must be adaptable to evolving circumstances and dynamic emergency scenarios. Building flexibility into the plan enables it to respond promptly to new threats and challenges, incorporating lessons learned from previous incidents.

Furthermore, clear communication and training are critical considerations. Effective communication ensures that all stakeholders are aware of their roles and responsibilities during emergencies. Comprehensive training programs empower personnel with the necessary skills to execute the plan efficiently.

Lastly, continuous improvement should be emphasized. By capturing lessons learned from real incidents and exercises, the plan can be regularly updated and refined. Encouraging a culture of continuous improvement ensures that the plan remains relevant and effective over time.

In conclusion, careful consideration of stakeholder engagement, resource allocation, flexibility, risk assessment, communication, training, and continuous improvement is vital in the implementation of Phase 3. By addressing these factors, the updated Implementation plan becomes a robust and adaptive strategy, effectively safeguarding lives and property during emergencies, and bolstering the overall preparedness and response capabilities of the organization or community.

 

 

 

Now, let's get practical!

 

We recommend that you begin by analyzing your organization's current state using our PRO.D.I.G.Y Gap tool. Enter and fill in your answers. In the end, you will receive your individual results and recommendations on how to start your journey towards inclusive emergency preparedness. Click the image to enter the tool:

Online Test

Secondly, you should attend the PRO.D.I.G.Y Training Course. This course is designed to equip individuals and companies with the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively respond to emergency situations while accommodating the needs of people with disabilities. You have the flexibility to navigate through the course based on your specific needs. Whether you prefer to go through the entire course from start to end or jump into chapters that are relevant to your current situation, the choice is yours. In each chapter, you will find a self-assessment quiz to test your knowledge and reinforce your learning.

e-Course

And lastly, we have prepared a toolbox with helpful materials, templates, and worksheets. You can find everything you need to effectively plan and practice your inclusive emergency preparedness procedures here.

Toolbox

 

Happy Learning!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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